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Parish Nurse

Nancy Amo_2013The Parish Nurse exists to minister to the whole person – body, mind and spirit by encouraging healing and health, linking individuals with resources, providing educational opportunities and ministering to the spiritual needs of the individual.

The Parish Nurse provides:

  • Visitation to hospitals, care facilities or homes
  • CPR/AED and first aid training
  • Blood pressure clinics
  • Blood drives
  • Health fairs
  • Disaster preparedness information
  • Educational seminars
  • Resources and information on home care, assisted living, social services, mental health, and counseling
  • References to support groups

For more information or help, contact Nancy Amo RN at: 714.505.6254 x 123 or email at nancy@tupcsa.org. Office hours: Tues.-Thur. 10:00a-3:00p

UNDERSTANDING DIABETES
Diabetes is a condition in which the pancreas does not make enough insulin. Insulin is required to help cells turn sugar and starches into energy.

There are 2 types of Diabetes. Type I usually develops in childhood. The pancreas cannot produce insulin; therefore, a person with Type I Diabetes requires daily insulin injections.

Type II usually develops in adults over 40, but is becoming more common in overweight children and young adults. It is associated with a family history of diabetes, obesity, and lack of exercise. The pancreas may produce insulin but it is not enough or the body is unable to use it properly. Therefore, a person with Type II Diabetes requires oral medications and sometimes insulin injections.

Treatment for both types of Diabetes is based on controlling blood sugar levels. This is done by carefully balancing oral medication/insulin injections with food intake and activity levels.

Unbalanced blood sugar levels may result in Low Blood Sugar or High Blood Sugar. People with Diabetes learn to recognize early warning signs and assist themselves in correcting an imbalance. However, when symptoms are too severe for self-care, a first aider can provide needed support for recovery.

FIRST AID FOR HIGH BLOOD SUGAR
Caused by not taking enough oral medications and/or insulin injections, eating too much food, not enough physical activity, or illness.

SIGNS OF HIGH BLOOD SUGAR (May occur over hours or days)
Drowsy and/or Confusion
Thirst and frequent urination
Hunger or loss of appetite
Deep, rapid breathing
Fruity breath odor
Flushed skin
Unconsciousness

1. Get immediate medical help – urgent care is needed.
Note: If able and test kit is available, have person test blood to determine whether or not insulin is needed according to the person’s Diabetic Care Plan.

2. If person becomes unconscious:

Call 9-1-1 (or local emergency #).
Lay person down and position on left side in Recovery Position.
– Roll onto left side (keeping body as 1 unit).
– Put head on arm and hand.
– Bend legs to maintain side position.
Monitor responsiveness and breathing.
If person becomes unresponsive to voice and touch, begin CPR

FIRST AID FOR LOW BLOOD SUGAR
Caused by taking too much insulin, not eating enough food, exercising too much, or illness.

SIGNS OF LOW BLOOD SUGAR
Sweaty
Shaky and/or Dizzy and/or Stumbling Gait
Hungry
Sleepy
Confused and/or Irritable
LATE SIGNS: Seizures and Unconsciousness

IF PERSON WITH DIABETES DOES NOT HAVE A BLOOD TEST KIT

  1. If conscious and able to swallow, give 1 dose of fast-acting sugar such as ½ cup of fruit juice or soft drink, 1 tablespoon honey, 1 tablespoon of sugar mixed in water, 6-10 lifesavers or ½ tube of instant glucose.
    – and –
    Wait 5 – 10 minutes for signs of low blood sugar to disappear.
  2. If no improvement, repeat Step 1.
  3. If still no improvement, repeat Step 1, one more time.

******DO NOT USE SUGAR FREE candy, juices, or soft drinks.******
IF PERSON WITH DIABETES HAS A BLOOD TEST KIT

  1. If conscious and able to swallow, give 1 dose of fast-acting sugar such as ½ cup of fruit juice or soft drink, 1 tablespoon honey, 1 tablespoon of sugar mixed in water, 6-10 lifesavers or ½ tube of instant glucose.
    – and –
    Wait 5 – 10 minutes for signs of low blood sugar to disappear. Then have person test blood to determine if blood sugar is improved/within normal.
  2. If no improvement, repeat Step 1.
  3. If still no improvement, repeat Step 1, one more time.

IF PERSON CANNOT SWALLOW – OR – LOW BLOOD SUGAR SIGNS CONTINUE AFTER CARE – OR – PERSON BECOMES LESS RESPONSIVE OR HAS SEIZURES

Call 9-1-1 (or local emergency #).
Lay person down and position on side.
Monitor responsiveness and breathing.
If person becomes unresponsive to voice and touch, begin CPR.

WHEN RECOVERED
Have person resume normal activity.
Have person eat a snack (such as 6 crackers with cheese or peanut butter) ONLY IF more
than 1 hour until mealtime – AND – IF person’s diabetic care plan recommends a snack
when recovered.

Resources for Counseling:

Kathy Lockridge, MDiv, LMFT
17291 Irvine Boulevard, Tustin, CA 92780
714.669.9669

Center for Individual and Family Counseling (CIFT) info@cift-usa.com
850 Town and Country Rd. Orange, CA 92868  714.558.9266

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